Arguing with a magic mirror for #WIPpet Wednesday

Last week, I got a surprising amount of wordage written, despite all the preparations for the launch of Island of Glass. (Thank you all very much for your help!) Anyway, the book is now published, I’ve gotten back into the swing of things regarding marketing my fiction, and last week I added a total of 6,000 words to various projects.

I’m still undecided whether I will try to do Nano this year. I have so many projects going right now, I don’t really want to abandon any of them. Well, I still have a couple of days to decide.

I also wanted to mention that with Halloween coming up, I’m going to be giving away my short story, “Misty and the Magic Pumpkin Knife” from Oct. 30 – Nov. 3 FREE on Amazon. So if you don’t have it yet, grab yourself a copy!

After that brief update, let’s continue on to WIPpet Wednesday. Dowager Princess Zilia has just dismissed the witch Vanna and is very irritated with the magic mirror for not performing for her as it did for the witch. For Oct. 29, I give you 7 short paragraphs for the day of the month (9-2):

She put the precious apple on a side table and drew a deep breath, then another, and another. She had the magic mirror, and she could call on Vanna’s services at any time. She did not need to control the magic herself — she had a monopoly on the purveyors of magic in Venice.
The only person she could truly trust was herself. She much preferred to have the reins in her own hands.
On the other hand, while a witch or an alchemist was perfectly capable of deception, what was the case with a magic mirror? Zilia had seen the mirror’s answers with her own eyes, after all, and they were quite clear.
The dowager princess turned back to the mirror. “So, Mirror, can you lie like the rest of us? Or must you always tell the truth?”
The mirror remained silent, the images it reflected unchanging.
Zilia began to pace her retiring room, forcing the mirror to follow her lead. “Perhaps I should return you to Vanna after all,” she said to the mirror. “Seeing as you are useless to me without her. But no, it is as I told the witch, I do not want anyone else accessing your magic at this time.”
The mirror followed her movements patiently.


Another mirror, just because it’s so pretty

WIPpet Wednesday is the brain child of K. L. Schwengel. If you’d like to participate, post an excerpt from your WIP on your blog, something that relates to the date in some way. Then add your link here — where you can also read the other excerpts.

Starting out as an indie author: Guest post on A.M. Leibowitz’s blog on the advantages of self-publishing

Starting out as an indie author

Today, for the publication of Island of Glass, my fellow WIPpeteer A.M. Leibowitz hosted me for a guest blog post on the advantages of self-publishing. Here an excerpt:

Speed

A traditionally published novel can easily take up to two years from the time it is accepted to the time it actually comes out. And that isn’t even counting the years of sending the manuscript out to agents and editors.

By comparison, self-publishing is almost instant. E-publishing may take up to a day from the time you hit the publish button until the time your book is available. Print on Demand (PoD) takes a little longer, but in my experience, the physical copy of your book is available in less than a week. Of course, that doesn’t include editing and cover design, but a self-publisher can probably have that completed in weeks rather than years.

You can read the rest of the article here.

To balance it out, I will eventually have to do a post on the disadvantages of self-publishing. But for now, all you get from me are the positives. :)

Island of Glass now live!

I’m happy to announce the publication of my YA novella, Island of Glass! Until the middle of November, it is still available for the introductory price of only 99c, after which it will go up to $2.99.

Island of Glass

Seventeen-year-old Chiara Dragoni is a master glassmaker of Venice, a position that is both a privilege — and a trap. For the glassmakers of Murano are forbidden to ever leave the islands of the Venetian lagoon.

When Chiara’s uncle is caught on the mainland and thrown into the dungeon of the Doge’s Palace, she must use all her talents, including magic, to help free him. But the gift she creates for the prince of Venice has unintended consequences, and now Chiara must decide whether to give up everything — and everyone — she knows and loves in order to save her dream.

Set in an alternate historical Venice with alchemists, witches and magic, the story uses familiar motifs from the beloved fairy tale “Cinderella” to tell a tale with a very different message.

Available on Amazon.

Coffee and Conversation: Of glassmaking and fairy tales and the beginning of story

Ruth Nestvold:

Shan Jeniah hosts me for a post about some of the inspirations that resulted in my upcoming novella, “Island of Glass”:

Originally posted on shanjeniah:

Grab a cuppa and a comfy seat, and let’s chat a while! It’stime for Coffee and Conversation!

When I was six, myfamilywas driving on a highway late at night. Streaks of headlights and taillights painted the dark. For the first time, I realized that each car held people living lives as important to them as mine was to me.

I wanted to know what those lives were, and to share my own..and today, that means welcoming author Ruth Nestvold, who is going to share how her Venice vacation with her daughter led to a novella…let’s all settle in and give Ruth our attention, while she spins us a tale…

Today I’m going to reveal a little bit about how my upcoming YA fantasy novella,Island of Glass, started to come together in my writer brain. I first began to conceive of the idea for…

View original 899 more words

Potential Self-Publishing Mudholes: A guest post on Beth Camp’s blog

In connection with the blog blitz for the upcoming publication of Island of Glass, fellow writer Beth Camp hosted me on her blog to talk about some potential mistakes indie writers can make. Here a short excerpt from the introduction:

The beauty and the curse of self-publishing is that it is so much easier and faster than going the traditional route, which can take years and (most of the time) still result in nothing. A fact that is often ignored is that self-publishing — while faster — most of the time also results in nothing. Which leads me straight to the first mistake made by indie authors.

You can read the rest over on Beth’s blog:

http://bethandwriting.blogspot.de/2014/10/potential-self-publishing-mudholes.html

Featured Image -- 1507

Pantsy Plotter and the Templates of Story-Telling

Ruth Nestvold:

I haven’t decided yet whether I want to do Nano this year or not, since I have so many ongoing projects, but for those who will be tackling it, Conny Kaufmann has put together a nice list of templates.

Originally posted on Study. Read. Write.:

Some people fly by the seat of their pants when it comes to writing a novel. They just sit down and write, and hope for the best while they have a vague idea of what they want to write in their heads. These people are known as “Pantsers”.

In the other corner we have a group of writers we like to call “Plotters”. They plan chapter by chapter, outline their stories, research detailed descriptions, find photos or draw pictures of what their characters look like. The featured image above is JK Rowling’s outline for Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, by the way.

View original 692 more words

The Future, Imperfect available as a Kindle Countdown Deal until Oct. 27

Until Monday, Oct. 27, you can get my collection of six dystopian short stories, The Future, Imperfect, as a countdown deal for only 99c.

The Future, Imperfect

Description:

“The Future, Imperfect” is a collection of near future, dystopian short stories by Ruth Nestvold. Environmental changes — slow in some regions, catastrophic in others — have had a major effect on our world, not for the better. While water wars and pandemics have devastated the Mediterranean region, and a major earthquake and the resulting destruction of nuclear power plants and sensitive research facilities have made much of California a wasteland, corporate-sponsored enclaves defend themselves from the have-nots. What can any one individual do to make a difference is such a world? These are the stories both of those who tried and those who failed.

Five of the short stories in this collection were previously published in such venues as Asimov’s and Futurismic. “Exit Without Saving” also appeared in Rich Horton’s Science Fiction 2007: The Best of the Year. “Killfile” is an original publication.

Enjoy!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,248 other followers

%d bloggers like this: