A Chronicle of the Amazon Page Flip Controversy: Or, how to piss off a ton of your vendors all at once

For the past several weeks (and in some case months), authors publishing through KDP Select have been noticing a massive decrease in pages read (KENP = Kindle Edition Normalized Pages). I blogged about his before here and here, mostly about how it has hit me personally. In this post I would like to attempt a summary of what’s been going on and what the authors affected think might be causing it.

Most of what I know comes from a discussion thread on Kboards, a forum for indie authors. The thread was started on Oct. 2, and authors quickly began chiming in with information on decreasing numbers of pages read on Amazon. A few authors said they had seen no decrease, but the vast majority have observed decreases of between 30% – 90%.

Naturally, once we noticed that we weren’t the only ones taking a huge hit to the pocketbook — and it wasn’t just because everyone who borrowed our books had started hating them after reading the first page — we started to collectively look for answers. We also started writing Amazon Support to complain and try to find out what was going on. In the new KDP Select system, authors have no information on how often their books are actually borrowed, only how many pages are read. But all of us keep records of sales and income, including KENP, which makes it easier to compare notes.

Soon, authors began narrowing in on the new “Page Flip” mode as a possible culprit. Page Flip was announced on June 28, but it was several weeks later before it was available on most newer Kindle devices. This fits with many authors noticing a decrease in pages read beginning in around August. If you don’t know what Page Flip is, here’s an article about it in TechTimes.

Once Page Flip was identified as at least one possible reason for the decreases authors were seeing, a number of those on Kboards tested it for themselves, including David VanDyke, whom I reblogged a couple of days ago. But in this context, it’s important to take a look at one of the passages in that post again:

“Using my KU account, I borrowed one of my own low-selling books that gets fewer than 100 page reads per day, normally zero. I used my iPhone and the Kindle app, so that the book opened automatically in Page Flip mode and kept it there. I paged through the entire book. Result? One (1) page read exactly, up from zero (0). Yup. One. Just as many others are reporting on KBoards and elsewhere.”

Now, all this time, Amazon is apparently getting a deluge of complaints from angry authors. Since we were sharing things in the discussion thread on Kboards, we were all well aware that we were getting the same canned responses. Here is the first one a number of authors received, starting on about Oct. 4:

“I understand you are concerned about lower than expected pages read in your reports. We’ve thoroughly reviewed all of your KU/ KOLL borrows and can confirm that the pages read displayed in your dashboard are accurate.”

On Oct 5, Amazon posted this announcement on the KDP support forum:

We’ve recently received a number of contacts regarding KENPC counts and have been investigating each case to make sure our KENPC reporting is timely and accurate. We regularly monitor pages-read systems for accuracy and to ensure we are recording all legitimate reading activity, including a month-end audit. In the past week, we uncovered one timing-based reporting issue affecting less than 0.2% of pages read which we fixed on 9/28. We are also now in the process of completing our September month-end audit.

Should you have specific questions about your account, please contact us at https://kdp.amazon.com/self-publishing/contact-us.

Followed on Oct. 6 by this announcement:

We have completed our monthly audit of September pages-read data. We regularly monitor pages-read systems for accuracy with a particular focus on making sure we have correctly filtered out fraudulent reading activity, while including all legitimate customer behavior. Total audit adjustments for the month were an increase of roughly 2% of pages read (though the amount will vary from author to author). We are currently updating reports and changes should be visible within the next day.

We expect the September fund to increase again compared to August and will release the new figure by mid-month as usual.

Thanks for the recent questions from some authors about how Page Flip is being used by customers and its possible impact to pages read. Page Flip is designed to make it easy to explore and navigate in books while automatically saving your place, and that is how customers are using it. We checked for effects on pages read before launching Page Flip, and investigated it again to re-confirm that there is no impact. We do not see any material reading volume happening within this feature, but we will continue to monitor it closely.

And this on Oct. 12:

Some authors have asked questions about Page Flip’s usage not counting towards page counts. Page Flip is a navigational tool. By design, using it for navigation does not count toward pages read. We are monitoring Page Flip usage data and it is not being used for reading in any material way. We will continue to monitor for any changes in reader behavior.

This statement is patently misleading. Either Page Flip does record pages read and Amazon just isn’t including any reading done in this mode as counting towards KENP, or it doesn’t “by design”, and Amazon doesn’t have any data on which to base any assumptions regarding reader behavior when using Page Flip. But as you can see from this promotional Amazon video, it is quite possible to read in this mode:

Kindle Page Flip mode

Amazon’s argument is essentially that since Page Flip wasn’t designed to be used for reading, using it that way doesn’t count toward pages read, whether they are actually recorded or not.

Finally, here is the answer email most authors are getting when complaining that since the introduction of Page Flip, their pages read have taken a nosedive:

Thanks for providing these details. The business team audited our systems using the specific information you shared regarding pages read and sales and did not find any systematic issues impacting your results.

Once again — how can they really know? Are they interviewing their KU customers to find out how they are using Page Flip? Do they even have data on the number of pages “navigated” rather than read?

Page Flip does not seem to the be the only cause of the huge losses many authors are seeing in their income from Amazon, but speculation regarding other things like another change in algorithms computing rankings, or some new policy to combat scammers and fraud, or the effects of the new “Prime Reading” program (you can read about this here and here) can remain only that — speculation. Eventually, with more data, Kindle authors will probably have a better grasp of how sales and pages read in the new Kindle environment translate into rank, but whatever is going on right now is just too new for any realistic conclusions. By contrast, Kindle authors have proven by testing it on themselves that reading a whole book in Page Flip mode only results in one page read. Searching for “Page Flip” either on Google or Twitter is all that is necessary to see that readers ARE using it to read books.

So why is Amazon not addressing this problem, and basically telling us authors that we are suffering from a collective hallucination? Speculation on Kboards is rife about that as well. It’s been pointed out that Amazon has been taking a beating financially after introducing Kindle Unlimited in Japan. A number of people think KU has become too expensive for Amazon and they want to phase it out. But why then not just do it, rather than making a huge number of your authors angry at you first? We will probably never know.

Anyway, to get back to me, after I received the (very insulting) email about the page reads in my dashboard being accurate, I sent them this very angry email:

Given the admission by Amazon that Page Flip does not count pages, combined with extensive evidence on the Internet and Kboards (among others) that readers are using Page Flip to read ebooks — not to mention that Page Flip is the default mode on a number of devices — Amazon is guilty of breach of contract regarding my books that are in Kindle Unlimited, by which I am to be paid for each page read for borrowed books. Since that is not possible with Page Flip, I hereby regard the exclusivity required by Kindle Unlimited as null and void. If I am not being paid for pages read, I see myself as free to publish elsewhere, seeing as Amazon broke the contract they had with me.

The next day, I received notification that the last four books I still had in Select had been removed. Now I no longer have to sell my book for one KENP — or half-a-cent — each. I just have to learn how to sell on other platforms.🙂

Wish me luck!

Jutoh Page-Flip Hack

If you need to make your books non-page flip compliant in Jutoh, here’s a quick lesson.

Source: Jutoh Page-Flip Hack

Note: I haven’t tried this myself, since I don’t have Jutoh, but I have unpublished Yseult for now, since Amazon hasn’t allowed me to get out of KDP Select. I can’t do that with Shadow of Stone, since I have a promo I’ve committed to coming up. But for me, Yseult is the main culprit for lost pages, since it is over 900 KENP long. That’s a lot of money lost when reads only count for one page.😦

My emails to Amazon still haven’t garnered any more than canned responses, and I haven’t yet decided what else to do, other than go wide when my books are freed up from Kindle Unlimited.

More “Tales of the Rose Knights” up on DSF starting today!

Daily Science Fiction is starting a new round of stories in the Tales of the Rose Knights that I wrote with Jay Lake. Today, “Descanso Dream”:

Descanso is the smallest of the Rose Knights, and perhaps the strangest. He is a dream made flesh, a pale man with skin the white of the ocean’s dead, riding a horse of fog and silk. His banners trail behind him like a wind from the Orient. His smile gleams of starlight and the gentle thoughts of a loving woman.

Read more.

Single White Rose and Reflection 2
(c) Rakel Leah Mogg, Creative Commons License

Bye, Bye, KDP Select; Or, How I Got Screwed by Amazon (and You May Have Been Too)

I blogged a couple of days ago about how some kind of software glitch seems to be swallowing authors’ pages read, and posted the email I sent to Amazon about it.

Well, two days later, still no answer. Two days with a total of 24 pages read, when my daily average is closer to 1000. For all of October, I have have had less than half the pages read that I usually have in a single day. My pages read have flatlined, my rankings have tanked, and my sales have come to a halt. It looks like I’m going to have to start all over again — all over again.

I have since learned that the problem of the missing pages is probably connected to Amazon Kindle’s new feature, Page Flip, a navigational tool meant to be used to search books for specific passages. Unfortunately for authors, Amazon does not seem to have included a function to register pages flipped through. So if a reader who borrows a book from Amazon uses this function to read the book, it only counts as one page read — even if that reader reads all 900 pages of Yseult. (As a side note: today, the ranking of Yseult went from 200,000-something to 79,000 — with no sales and only 20 pages read. That makes absolutely no sense at all, unless at least half of those pages read are borrows, and all of those people borrowing the book only read one page. Go figure.)

Amazon is logically more concerned with providing an ideal experience for readers, their customers, rather than addressing the concerns of vendors, especially if they are such prawny content providers as I am. (“prawny” = opposite of big fish)

As a result, I sent Amazon an email today, requesting to have all my books still in Select removed as soon as possible, before the end of the three month period. KDPS has been good to me over the years, but I’ve realized now how Amazon truly feels about me, so it’s time to say goodbye to Select.

I can only suggest that everyone else with books in Select take a good look at their numbers for the last few months and decide what they want to do. Page Flip was introduced on June 28, but for most authors on Kboards, it has only become a serious problem in about the last month. And for readers, all I can do is ask you not to use Page Flip to read the books you borrow from Amazon.

Some authors on Kboards have suggested that Amazon is deliberately trying to lower the payout for authors, or get rid of those of us who aren’t successful enough, but I doubt it. I think instead that this is a prime example of Hanlon’s Razor: never attribute to malice that which can adequately be explained by stupidity. And here, add disinterest to the mix.

So, for now at least, I’m out. Bye, bye, KDP Select.

Been nice knowing you. Maybe we’ll see each other again someday.

Amazon KDP Select authors are losing page reads, apparently due to software glitches

Here’s another, longer report than the one I did yesterday on the present Amazon glitch in pages read.

I love Amazon’s KDP Select almost as much as I love Buster, my 13-year-old Pekeapom, a mix of Pekingese and Pomeranian, the dog you see to the right.

But my rescue pup dirties up the carpet every now and then. And in a way that’s exactly what KDP has been doing lately.

Last month, some alert authors smelled mismatches and oddities in the reporting of their page reads from subscribers to Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited service (KU). “Page reads” is the number of standardized Kindle pages read—this varying amount usually brings U.S. writers between 0.4 and half a cent.

The page read numbers roughly tend to follow a KU author’s retail sales curve (the books people purchase, rather than read through KU), sometimes a day or two delayed.

Longer books normally have more page reads, of course. New releases tend to see a steep jump in page reads that rises to a peak a few weeks or months out…

View original post 2,339 more words

Possible glitch in pages read (KENP) for Kindle Unlimited books

Since the beginning of the month, the numbers of pages read of my Kindle Select titles has gone from a daily average of about 800 to a measly 50. Okay, it’s only one week, I kept trying to tell myself, it will pick up again — and then I read this thread on the Kboards: http://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,242225.0.html

It looks like it’s an actual glitch on the part of Amazon, and one that they’re denying, to boot. Which means that a lot of us may be out of a lot of money, and no way to fix it or be reimbursed for our losses.

So instead of writing, I composed a letter to Jeff Bezos and KDP Support:


Since the beginning of the month, I have a seen a dramatic drop in the number of pages read (KENP) of my books that are in Kindle Unlimited. My averages vary widely, from a few hundred pages on a slow day to several thousand pages on a good day. Since the beginning of the month, however, my best day was 123 pages, with most days being below 50. (See attached screenshot of my dashboard.) This is a particularly strange development for my long fantasy novels: several days in a row one page read per day, when I usually have several hundred pages read a day.

I would greatly appreciate it if you could look into this for me. Pages read are a significant percentage of my writing income, and without them, KDP Select would no longer be interesting for me financially.

Thanks in advance,

Ruth Nestvold

Amazon Author Page:


KENP Nestvold

If you are a Kindle author with books in KDP Select, I strong recommend taking a look at your KENP averages for the last couple of months. A number of authors on the Kboards have been seeing problems since September and even earlier. The only way to get this fixed is for all of us speak up.

Indie Author Interviews: T.S. Vale, Exscendent SF Series

I am very happy today to welcome T.S. Vale to the indie author interview series, a dear friend going back to Clarion days, and a writer of both beautiful words and amazing ideas. Take it away, T.!

First off, please tell us a little bit about you and your work.

The single unchanging passion I’ve had my entire life — is for story-hearing and story-telling. It’s a powerful call that never fades.

As some who know me are aware, I experienced early success in traditional publishing in terms of both sales and recognition. But my big focus at the time was finishing college, not capitalizing on the success of my first novel. (Oops?!)

Fast forwarding through various life adventures, including a few quick dips here and there back into the world of writing and publishing — such as my time at Clarion West with Ruth and other great authors and instructors! — I’m delighted to be launching a couple of new series that fall into the category I love most of all: speculative fiction.

Speculative fiction is a broad term, yes. But it’s the best at capturing a majority of the kind of reading and writing I love best.

The AMERICUS series is post-apocalyptic / dystopian / alternate America. The DARKCRASHER series is best described as The Matrix meets Game of Thrones — a dark epic fantasy / dystopian tech fantasy hybrid.

What made you decide to become an “indie” author?

For me, indie / traditional comes across as a choice between chocolate or vanilla. Both flavors have their charms. And while I know some people have a very clear favorite, I find chocolate and vanilla equally appealing and meritorious. Each has unique attributes, and each offers something the other does not.

So why did I pick the flavor I did, for my relaunch back into the world of publishing? In the end, I loved what I perceived as the egalitarian and entrepreneurial nature of indie. Not that these qualities don’t exist in the traditional world: it’s simply that as an indie author, I felt that I’d get the chance to be far more “hands-on” than I might be otherwise. It’s a lot of fun, frankly!

How do you go about world-building?

As corny as this sounds, each world I’ve built has first appeared in a dream. It then unfolds in my waking mind … every day. (I’m not kidding. Not a day goes by that I’m not inside these worlds, even if only for a few moments. What else is there to do while waiting in line or brushing your teeth, after all? Grin.)

Research follows as I figure out the mechanics behind what I’m imagining. Research is documented in various ways. Sometimes I capture all of what’s needed in a few words that I file as a document or even as simply an email. Other times, for richer worlds, I need more. What I call the “wikipedia” for DARKCRASHER is huge.

Do you have a writing routine?

Alas. I wish I did. I’m eternally working on better discipline.

Some people have gotten a kick out of the fact that sometimes, in order to focus, I will do this:
I go to a dark windowless room. I turn out all lights, put on headphones, and sit cross-legged on the floor. And then I write.

It’s not a routine, but it has gotten me through some “stuck” times.

What have you already published?

Traditionally published under other names:
A multi-awarded YA novel that almost made it to the silver screen (script was written, stars chosen including Keanu Reeves yes really, but — as happens — it didn’t quite make it in the end). This book is an older item, you won’t find it on the shelves anywhere, but the rights are mine and I’ll be re-releasing that novel soon. In addition, a handful of shorts in both YA and speculative fiction. I haven’t published a lot, but I’m proud that each thing I have published traditionally, has received some kind of recognition or award.

Indie, as TS Vale:
The first installment of the AMERICUS series is available on Amazon. Full title: AMERICUS • Exscendent, Book 1: High Road Cross.
The first installment of the DARKCRASHER saga will be out in October.
You can also find In the Real, a dystopian SF thriller / SF romance short novella that was originally published under another name, and Library, a post-apocalyptic / SF romance short story.

What are you working on now?

The AMERICUS series and the DARKCRASHER saga are the big ones at the moment.

Do you make your covers yourself or do you hire a cover artist?

Both. Mostly with a cover artist, but a couple on my own.

What do you think are the advantages of indie publishing? Of traditional publishing?

Indie advantages: You’re hands-on. You’re on the front lines. You have more personal control over timelines. And best of all, it feels to me like you’re more closely in touch with your readers.

Traditional advantages: A large established system at your back. You’re not “doing it all” all by yourself. Advances up front. And — possibly, in some circles? — there may be more of what I’ll call “perceived prestige”.

What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

Listen, learn, write, repeat.
And most of all: love what you do and do what you love.

How can people get in touch with you?

The hub for all things related to contacting me — newsletter, email, social channels, blog etc. —


Best way to stay in touch: sign up for the newsletter.

And here is the description of the first book of the series, Americus:

In a war-torn post apocalyptic America, Bill does not have a choice. To save what he loves, he must find and stop a deadly transhuman soldier gone rogue — his own biological father. And for that, he must become what he despises.



Indie Author Interviews: K. J. Garnet, Oracle urban fantasy series

Every now and then on this blog I do interviews with indie and speculative fiction writers. Today I would like to introduce you to K. J. Garnet, the pen name of Kelly and Jenni, a pair of writers working on a new urban fantasy series about the oracle Val Ferrel.

Oracle in Doubt

First off, please tell us a little bit about you and your work.

K: I’m the “K” (Kelly) of the K.J. Garnet writing team. I’m the author of 3 non-fiction books and freelance writer in my field for magazine and editorial work.

J: I’m the “J” (Jenni) of the K.J. Garnet writing team. I’ve been a developmental editor for over twenty years first at major publishing houses and now as a consultant for independent writers.

We’ve written a paranormal fantasy aka contemporary/urban fantasy series about a medium named Val Ferrel who is a special kind of psychic called an oracle. Unlike the Greek oracles, who were seers, our oracles have a special ability that lets them siphon psychic energy from the land of the dead. In our fictional world, psychics are common and the world has evolved to accommodate people with these extra sensory abilities and those without.

When you write fantasy, how do you go about world-building?

K: I’m into the scenes and the details. Once we have the characters, I start writing scenes to get a sense of who they are and what makes them tick. I like to get into the characters’ heads, find out what drives them, and how their interactions affect the story.

J: I tend to think big and then start adding the details-the why of this particular thing/place/animal, how does it work, where can someone get it, what do our characters use it for, when will it affect the plot? For the Val Ferrel series, we didn’t want to get overly complicated, so we chose a familiar contemporary world but added some twists and tweaked it.

What kind of magic systems do you use?

J: We’re writing a contemporary supernatural or paranormal series, so our “magic” is a fast and loose version of ESP-empaths, prognosticators, mediums, telepathy, telekinesis. There’s a bit of superhero-ness without the origin story; the powers just exist in our world and the technology grew up right alongside it, like jewels imbued with psychic energy protects people from intrusive telepaths, or machines generate energy fields to block the psychics from using their innate powers.

Do you have a writing routine?

J: I try and write every morning except on the days I know Kelly will be writing. We share the same file and try to meet at least once a week to discuss the latest scene or chapter. Sometimes our talks go on for three or more hours since we’re still evolving our writing partnership. We’re getting better at predicting what the other one meant or intended. Having a broad outline of the story helps to keep us on track although we both have a tendency to come up with a lot of new and shiny ideas. My editorial side always urges us to stay on track, and setting a publishing deadline reminds us not to get too distracted.

K: Unfortunately, I have a demanding day job. My writing time is limited to weekends and whenever there’s a spare hour or two. I was desperate in the beginning to contribute late at night after the work day was over, but that didn’t work well. Scenes were treading into the psychedelic.

What made you decide to become an “indie” author?

J: Control. I like being able to control all the aspects of production, publishing, and sales. I like being the boss of my creative endeavors.

K: What she said. Love the fast turn-around time as well. I’m getting too old to wait 2-3 years from agent to publication!

What have you already published?

J: This is my first published work.

K: This is my fourth and fifth but we’ll count it as first for fiction.

What are you working on now?

J: We’re working on the third book in the Val Ferrel series, ORACLE IN CHARGE. After that, sky’s the limit-we have a ton of ideas plus a handful of half-finished projects.

Do you make your covers yourself or do you hire a cover artist?

J: We’ve hired a cover artist and designer.

What do you think are the advantages of indie publishing? Of traditional publishing?

J: The biggest advantage of being independent is the money-we receive 70% of
our sales. No traditional publisher gives that kind of royalty. Plus, we control all aspects of the publishing-no publisher would give us final approval on cover art and design, interior art and design, marketing strategy, cover copy/sales copy, pub release dates, formats.

For us right now, there’s no advantage to being with a traditional publisher. Our goals are different than a traditional publisher, so being independent works better for us.

K: Also, our books don’t have a 3-6 month shelf life before being remaindered. Word of mouth works well on the internet.

What advice would you give to an aspiring author?

J: If you’re thinking about publishing yourself, hire (at least) a copyeditor and a cover designer. Have common sense expectations-it will take time for your potential fans to find you. Keep writing, keep publishing. Make mistakes, learn from them, do better next time. Never forget that publishing is a business.

If you’re not quite ready to publish, learn how to self-edit. Read everything. Do your homework on the craft. Don’t rely on spellcheck. Finish your projects even if you don’t think they’re “good enough”. It’s always easier to edit a draft than to struggle with the “perfect” sentence or scene or plot. Remember this is not a zero sum game-you are not competing with all the other writers in the world. Write what makes you happy-not all stories are for all people, and that’s okay.

K: For indie authors, remember you are your own promotions department. Learning something about advertising copy and marketing will be extremely helpful.

How can people get in touch with you?

They can reach us at garnetkj15@gmail.com

Blog:  https://kjgarnet.com/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/KJGarnetAuthor
Goodreads author page: https://www.goodreads.com/14164918.K_J_Garnet
Twitter: https://twitter.com/WriterGarnet

And here’s the description of the first book of the series, Oracle in Doubt:

A failed psychic medium is forced to work with an enigmatic government agent to close a gate to the afterlife before it releases the dead back into the world of the living.

Val Ferrel was once a successful psychic medium for the Boston Police Department, until a botched case blew out her abilities and ended her career. Fleeing to the West Coast to escape family responsibilities, she struggles to make ends meet. When a simple job for a ghost-hunting show puts her in contact with an angry ghost and activates startling new psychic abilities, Val knows she’s in over her head.

Agent Daniel Norris, director of the Agency of Extra Sensory Remedy and Response, is cool, confident, and plans everything to the last detail. His Agency’s directive is to prevent the aristocratic psychic Families from returning to dynastic rule; his mission is to control a feisty psychic the Agency blames for the appearance of a new gate to the afterlife. But as Val destroys plan after well-laid plan, Daniel never dreams they’ll both hold the key to solving the case.

Working with the stuffy Agency director is the least of Val’s problems. Can she stay hidden from her own family before the aristocratic syndicates move in? More importantly, will she be able to control her own powers before the living fall prey to the dead?

The monthly SFF promo is here again! Over 100 books for 99c each, Sept 3-4


We have another great promo for fans of science fiction and fantasy this month — over 100 books, all for only 99c! The sale officially starts tomorrow, Sept. 3, but a lot of the books are already reduced in price. Like my contribution, Shadow of Stone. the second book in the Pendragon Chronicles series, available on Amazon for only 99c. Or my collection of short stories, Oregon Elsewise, available on B&N, Kobo and Apple for only 99c.

Oregon Elsewise

So check out the sale, and good luck finding something you want!

And sorry about the recent radio silence. I decided to mostly ignore social media until I get the next couple of books finished. Once I get a few of those projects off my plate, I’ll be back.🙂

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