Using Vellum for formatting e-books

Ever since I started going indie and publishing books on my own rather than through a traditional publisher, I have been using Scrivener to create the epub and mobi files required by most retailers. Okay, not ever since — my very first experimental attempts were uploading Word docs to Amazon and Smashwords, and they were resounding failures. But once Scrivener added epub export to its many wonderful writing tools, that is what I have been using as my default e-book formatting program.

I have a new program for that now: Vellum.

Vellum is beautiful — and expensive. And it only works on a Mac. I am a PC user — pedestrian, mundane, and mostly immune to the Apple Cult. My smartphone is a Samsung. Hardware is not a status symbol for me. Yes, Apple makes pretty hardware, but it is outrageously expensive and somehow lives almost on reputation alone, which I find mildly baffling.

But — I broke down and bought my first MacBook back in the day when Scrivener was only available on the Mac. I have been a devoted Scrivener user ever since — and was incredibly relieved when Literature and Latte finally brought out a version of Scrivener for Windows. Oh joy, I would never have to use a Mac again!

Fast forward almost a decade — and me drooling over the beautiful e-books of some of my colleagues created using Vellum. So I finally broke down again and bought a refurbished sleek and shiny little MacBook Air on sale. And it really is amazingly lovely, I have to admit — even though I’m not a Mac fan. 🙂 I would much rather carry it around than some designer handbag. If only it acted a little more like a PC …

I haven’t used Vellum a lot yet, but it seems to be fairly straightforward, with a minimal learning curve (except for the fact that it is on a Mac). Not only does it create very professional looking e-books, it will generate different e-books for a number of stores simultaneously (iBooks, Kindle, Kobo, Nook, Google Play), so you don’t have to do that yourself. And if you use an aggregator like Draft2Digital or Smashwords, it also has a “generic” epub option. It does involve some setting up for the various retailers, but once that is taken care of, you can compile the e-books for all the stores where you sell your books at once.

There are several styles to choose from, designed to suit different genres.

Once you have chosen a style, the final formatting recognizes simple scene breaks like *** and transforms them into into the ornamental break associated with your choice.

Vellum is free to download. You don’t have to pay until you generate your first book. You can either pay $29.99 per title, $99.99 for ten titles, or get an unlimited license for $199.99.

I have only uploaded one book formatted with it so far, and I had some problems with the file for Kobo, so I am definitely not the expert. I intend to switch over anyway, though, gradually replacing the files for all the books I have already published. Unfortunately, Amazon doesn’t seem to update the look inside feature with the newer, prettier e-book format, so one of the advantages I had hoped for is gone. But at least in future, my newly published ebooks will look more professional. And if they ever add a print function, as they claim to be thinking about, that would be a huge time-saver. (You can read about how I format for Print on Demand here.)

If you found this blog post helpful, perhaps you would be interested in the book, Starting Out as an Indie Author! You can learn more here.

If you’re interested in learning more about Vellum, here are some links to folks who are savvier regarding the program than I am (and have images to share *g*):

Review: Vellum, the ebook generator for Mac with added prettiness

http://www.thecreativepenn.com/2016/10/20/vellum/

http://www.macworld.com/article/2084960/vellum-review-app-offers-a-sleeker-way-to-build-ebooks.html

https://help.vellum.pub/tutorial/

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12 thoughts on “Using Vellum for formatting e-books”

  1. Hmm. Sounds like Vellum gives you your own little Meatgrinder (a la Smashwords). It also sounds like a mixed blessing, unless you’re already a Mac user/lover. I agree that making ebooks beautiful is a worthy goal, but so far I’ve restricted that to the print versions of my books. Still, one more tool to know about.

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